Monday, January 15, 2018

HUNDREDS of Twitter Employees Paid to View "Everything You Post," & Private "Sex Messages..


Project Veritas has released undercover footage of Twitter Engineers and employees admitting that Twitter employees view"everything you post" on their servers, including private "sex messages," and "d*ck pics." The engineers also admit that Twitter analyzes this information to create a "virtual profile" of you which they sell to advertisers. James O’Keefe has just completed a book about this series entitled "AMERICAN PRAVDA: My fight for Truth in the Era of Fake News." The book will be released by St. Martin’s Press on January 16, 2018.

More here.

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Be Careful! You Can be Bugged in the Office..

Is your office bugged? Use these tips to detect bugs and electronic eavesdropping devices in your office.

Bugs, these treacherous tiny electronic devices can infest your home or even your office. Just like real life bugs, these devices are able to hide in small corners and mostly go unnoticed. With bugs near you in your workplace, you could disclose valuable information to strangers. People can steal your ideas, rob your intellectual property and use your private information against you.
You don’t want these things happening to you, right? So, how can you prevent your information from getting into the wrong hands? Here are some important tips from professionals to save you from getting bugged in the office.

1.    Keep your Eyes Open

Always be on the lookout for those people who need confidential and valuable information at work. In case you sense that employees or competitors have obtained information about matters that are supposed to be confidential, think how they have acquired this information which only you know of.

2.    Unfamiliar Faces

Aside from your colleagues, also keep an eye out for unfamiliar visitors who visit your office. Pay close attention to people who claim to be inspectors, technicians and exterminators. Buggers can sometimes disguise themselves as workers and install their malicious devices to steal your confidential information.

3.    Lookout for Vehicles

Be cautious of vehicles like vans and panel trucks that may loiter near your building. Also, keep an eye out for the vehicles that appear in your area repeatedly. There could be someone inside the vehicle, listening to your conversations through the electronic bugs they have set in your office.

4.    Be Cautious of New Things

Things that come in your office may already be bugged by those wanting to steal your confidential information. Have the items arriving in your office checked by security to ensure that there aren’t any visible suspicious electronic devices attached to them.

5.    Look for Intrusion

Hone your senses to detect signs of potential intrusion. Examine your office rooms for any suspicious object and keep your ears open for odd clicks and noise. If there is a television in your office and it experiences signal interferences, then there might be a transmitter nearby.

6.    Master the Details

Master every detail of your room like the position of decorative items, light fixtures and exit signs. Be on the lookout for even a slightest change in the position of your belongings.

7.    Bugs May Already be There

You can prevent bugs from making their way into your office. But, what if they’re already there? The only thing to do in this case is here a professional to detect and sweep bugs from your office.

If you didn’t know about these important tips and think that you’ve been bugged already, hire a TSCM professional from ComSec to perform a bug sweep and get rid of any potential bugs in your office. 
Contact ComSec, we can help. 

Monday, January 1, 2018

The Secret KGB Manual for Recruiting Spies...

The document is from the Cold War. But the material it teaches is still being used today by Vladimir Putin’s clandestine cadres.

This is the first of a three-part series based on never-before-published training manuals for the KGB, the Soviet intelligence organization that Vladimir Putin served as an operative, and that shaped his view of the world. Its veterans still make up an important part of now-Russian President Vladimir Putin’s power base. All were trained in the same dark arts, and these primers in tradecraft are essential to an understanding of the way they think and the way they operate.

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Inside Oracle’s cloak-and-dagger political war with Google

Oracle has lobbied aggressively — and seeded negative stories about its search foe — as the two battle in court.

The story that appeared in Quartz this November seemed shocking enough on its own: Google had quietly tracked the location of its Android users, even those who had turned off such monitoring on their smartphones.

But missing from the news site’s report was another eyebrow-raising detail: Some of its evidence, while accurate, appears to have been furnished by one of Google’s fiercest foes: Oracle.

For the past year, the software and cloud computing giant has mounted a cloak-and-dagger, take-no-prisoners lobbying campaign against Google, perhaps hoping to cause the company intense political and financial pain at a time when the two tech giants are also warring in federal court over allegations of stolen computer code.

Since 2010, Oracle has accused Google of copying Java and using key portions of it in the making of Android. Google, for its part, has fought those claims vigorously. More recently, though, their standoff has intensified. And as a sign of the worsening rift between them, this summer Oracle tried to sell reporters on a story about the privacy pitfalls of Android, two sources confirmed to Recode.

Read more here.

https://www.recode.net/2017/12/6/16721364/oracle-google-political-war-location-track-android-safra-catz-java-lawsuit

Monday, October 23, 2017

Professional spy catchers in demand for bug-sweeping

*Note: Have you wondered if you need a sweep?
Don't wait, contact us today we can help. JDL~

In the trade it is known as TSCM but everyone else calls it bug-sweeping. It is not cockroaches that these pest controllers are hunting but eavesdropping devices that could be hidden anywhere from a mobile phone to the cable in the back of a computer.

Demand for the services of professional technical surveillance countermeasures specialists has grown dramatically along with public awareness of the dangers. Britain’s professional spy catchers have never been busier as businesses and wealthy individuals realise that they are being watched and listened to.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Scary mobile wireless flaw lets hackers track your cellphone's location..


If you're like a lot of people, you've probably worried for many years about other parties spying on you. Maybe it's a weird and persistent feeling that somebody's tracking or watching you each time you make a phone call or go online.

In our modern-day ultra connected world, the snoop could be anyone - advertisers, the government, hackers - with the right equipment, spying is quite a real-world possibility.

In fact, we told you about a device called a StingRay, which is essentially a portable, luggage-sized cellphone tower. Once they have a good idea where you are, snoops can switch to a portable device to track you down, to as precisely as a specific room in a building.

Older cellphones that use 2G connections were extremely vulnerable to Stingrays because of the 2G standard's weak encryption. With the introduction of the newer 3G and 4G LTE standards, the common belief is that this weakness has been remedied with stronger encryption. But is this still true?

Investments In IoT Security Mean Solution Providers Better Be Ready..


As Internet of Things security threats continue to rise, solution providers and vendors say they are starting to see the tide turn when it comes to real investments in IoT security technologies.

The comments come as the Black Hat 2017 conference in Las Vegas highlighted some of the latest threats against IoT devices, including attacks on smart locks, critical infrastructure, cars, smart buildings, industrial robots, radiation monitoring devices and more.

They also come after multiple high-profile IoT attacks in recent months, most notably with the Mirai botnet DDoS attacks launched through IoT devices including webcams, routers and video recorders.